Child Support Enforcement Unit

In Colorado, many child support cases are handled by the support unit of the Colorado Division of Child Support Services (CSEU). This department’s overall goal is to make sure all children receive the proper medical and financial support from each parent. The CSEU locates parents, establishes paternity and support obligations through the court, and enforces support payments. If you have or will have a child support order in Colorado, there’s a chance you may need services or assistance from this unit, so it’s smart to learn more about what they can and cannot do.

 

Available services

The CSEU can locate a parent, help establish a child’s support, seek and enforce medical support and child support orders for children, help a parent have a support order modified both in and out of state, collect and distribute child support, and provide referrals to employment, visitation and other family services.

However, this department does not handle other family law services such as parenting time allocation, divorce and legal separation, all of which medical and child support are sometimes a part of. If you need assistance with child support, contact the experienced staff of The Burnham Law Firm about your case today. We’ll work to ensure the best possible outcome for your case.

 

CSEU process overview

People who want to start a case through this unit are encouraged to contact the county unit that covers their area and ask about the requirements for starting their type of case. All offices charge an application fee of $20 (as of 2018) to get the application started. This fee does not apply to people who receive public assistance and were referred to the CSEU office, and some counties do waive this charge if the applicant is receiving a certain type of public assistance or is facing a financial hardship. There is also an annual $25 service fee for people who have never received any form of cash public assistance in any state and who have received at least $500 in actual child support payments over a federal year, which runs from October 1st to September 30th of the following year.

 

Child support enforcement

The CSEU has various methods of support payment enforcement available for cases handled through the unit. They can use an income assignment, which is sent to the employer of the paying parent, to take part of the parent’s wages for child support before he or she receives a paycheck. The agency can also search for employers if the paying parent hasn’t disclosed any using state resources. Both federal and state laws require employers to report new hires to a directory the unit is able to access as part of its authority.

For the enforcement of child support, the support can be deducted from unemployment compensation and workers’ compensation benefits paid by Colorado. The CSEU then sends the withheld money directly to the receiving parent in most cases.

Suspension of licenses is another tool the CSEU has to enforce the payment of owed child support. They can instruct the Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles to suspend a driver’s license of a non-paying parent, contact the relevant authority to suspend a professional or occupational license, and even suspend or deny fishing or hunting licenses belonging to parents who are behind on their child support.

Many types of payments made to a paying parent can be intercepted by the CSEU if they owe child support. This includes federal and state tax refunds; money owed to paying parents who have provided goods or services to the state; federal retirement benefits; lottery winnings, casino, race track and other gambling winnings; and unclaimed property that is currently in possession of the state. Unpaid child support may also be reported to the major credit bureaus, harming the credit score of a paying parent and making it harder for him or her to get credit products.

Child support enforcement can also take place through actions in the court system, which is why it is so important for parents to pay support on a consistent basis. This unit can place a lien on property that belongs to the paying parent or file a motion of contempt against him or her, and this could result in fines and/or jail time.

 

Child support modification

If you think your child support order needs to be modified, contact the trusted and experienced attorneys at The Burnham Law Firm about your case. As a paying parent, you must make your payments in full and on time. If you don’t, you could face consequences financially and in your professional life. As a receiving parent, you can’t demand more support even if you are entitled to it in return for the paying parent to have his or her court-awarded or agreed access to the children. Before you make a move in your child support case, contact The Burnham Law Firm to schedule a consultation and ensure you’re fully informed about your options.